Jocelle Koh

Writing has always been my chosen form of expression, and has opened up opportunities for me that I could only have dreamed of. As I've grown and started moving into other mediums of expression, writing has nevertheless accompanied me, recording my most prized experiences.

Interview with Joanna Wang 王若琳 - The Queen Of Wonderful Niches

“I’m always for wonderful niches.” Those choice words were how Taiwanese-American singer-songwriter Joanna Wang ended one of many passionate rambles educating us on the fascinating Australian cosplay wrestler Ladybeard and how he had chanced onto his niche in the Japanese market. In hindsight, it seemed that such rambles occurred frequently (and were very much fuelled by us) during our interview with the artist, where we discussed everything under the sun from Wang’s latest album ‘Modern Tragedy’ and her musical process, to her celebrity crush on Alan Rickman and love for Harry Potter (she's a certified Slytherin).

Interview with GorDoN國蛋 a.k.a Dr. Paper: From Taipei to NYC-Documenting His Cross-Cultural Experiences Through Rap

Compared with prolific Taiwanese rappers, GorDoN aka Dr. Paper’s laidback fare of hip hop music is often rather more suitable for bedtime tunes than the usual pumped up hip hop we’re used to. However, listen closely to his words and you will find his lyrics crammed with well-crafted anecdotes that often refer to his experiences living and breathing within a cross cultural context.

Interview with CantoMando: The Cool Kids of Chinese School

Almost every Asian kid who’s grown up in a Western country has some semblance of experience with ‘Chinese School’; an unappealing waste of any adolescent child’s weekend that could be better spent anywhere but in a classroom for six hours. In the two or three months I spent at Chinese school, the only word I remember learning was 不倒翁bu dao weng (a roly poly toy), a phrase which until today I have yet to put to good use.

Interview with Mia Yen-Bringing Taiwanese Music to The West Through Live Performance

If I had previously thought that there was no one else who had the same passion for bringing Taiwanese music to Western audiences, after meeting Mia Yen, I had to concede that I had met my match. The driven show curator, booking agent and all-round creative, who comes from a family of entertainment professionals has been shaking up the overseas market recently, helping all kinds of amazing indie Taiwanese acts to have their sounds heard live throughout North America. From cult R&B darling 9m88 to the legendary Anpu (formerly known as Deserts Xuan), independent music heroes FIRE EX. to Sunset Rollercoaster, Mia has her finger in almost every independent Taiwanese music pie that lands on US soil.

Interview With YM Chen陳央-Redefining 'Blue'

Equipped with a clean, hard-hitting set of vocals and a versatility that takes her easily across folk, jazz, funk and of course the rock genre, Taiwanese singer-songwriter YM Chen’s voice and musical style reveal a maturity and depth beyond her young years. Influenced by a classy selection of vintage folk and rock, Chen’s debut EP ‘She’s Blue Again藍色星期五’ traverses a plethora of social and philosophical ideas. Against the backdrop of a well-oiled blend of folk and rock, the 22 year-old discusses the concept of ‘Blue’ from all angles; be it musical, or cultural. Perhaps it would be best to start this discussion by finding out what the passionate individual defines as ‘Blue’:

Interview with Haneri (a.k.a Daphne’s Khoo) - Bridging cultural and musical gaps with optimism and (real) love

One of my best childhood memories while living in Singapore was watching the very first season of ‘Singapore Idol’, a spin-off of the then-wildly popular American reality singing series. Every episode, we would tune in and I would root for my favourite contestant Daphne Khoo. I was particularly enamoured with her rendition of Des’ree’s ‘You Gotta Be’, significantly marking my first forage into pop territory and the R&B genre.

Cream of the C-pop #4 - Interview With Kurt HUgo Schneider: Staying On Top Of His Game

Kurt Hugo Schneider is all about the grind. For all his millions of subscribers all over the world, the down-to-earth YouTuber is still used to wearing all the hats-from recording and producing his own tracks to filming and editing the videos. Known for his innovative and tasteful mashups and medleys of pop songs, the 30 year-old rose to fame when his Michael Jackson medley with Sam Tsui went viral. Since then, the multi-talented creative has continued to expend his influence by pumping out new, never-before-seen methods of transforming well-known songs. Be it sonically or visually, KHS is truly a pioneer of the remix culture as we know it today.

Interview With No Party For Cao Dong 草東沒有派對-Going With The (Post-Rock) Flow: How A Band Subconsciously Became A Musical Representation Of Taiwanese Contemporary Society

No Party For Cao Dong are a dichotomy. They are elusive; yet easy to talk to. They travel widely, and have toured the world with their music; yet gather inspiration exclusively from their experiences in Taiwan, the environment where they grew up in. Their music has had such a revolutionary impact on the scene, earning them multiple accolades and earfuls of praise; yet they are humble and subdued when asked about their achievement. The phrase that came up most during the interview was ‘沒有想那麼多 Didn’t think too much about it’, which seems to be part of the band’s musical philosophy.

interview with Modern Sky USA’s Sijie Liu: Bringing Asian music To The West Through Live promotion

A small-town girl with a deep love for music, Sijie Liu, currently the Vice President for Booking and Artist Development at the formidable Modern Sky USA has been at the peak of the trend bringing well-loved Asian indie artists to tour in the states over the last few years. From Korea’s Hyukoh to Taiwan’s Sunset Rollercoaster and Hong Kong heavyweight Edison Chen, Liu slowly opening the floodgates for Asian music to find a home and audiences in the West. In my experience, it often takes someone special to end up in a position like this, so I had to scratch my itch (as I do when finding like-minded people) by documenting her story in this Q&A.

Why Taiwan is still the creative heart of Mandopop

While those not in the know might still see Mandopop as a less well-produced version of K-pop, a light scratch beneath the surface reveals more depth and value in the scene than outsiders could possibly imagine. Starting from the top, Mandopop is essentially; as the name infers; Mandarin language popular music. This brand of pop music has long been characterised by sad ballads that are full of subtle, lyrical meaning, with Taiwan contributing greatly to this idea (and to the scene) ever since t

Why Taiwan is still the creative heart of Mandopop

While those not in the know might still see Mandopop as a less well-produced version of K-pop, a light scratch beneath the surface reveals more depth and value in the scene than outsiders could possibly imagine. Starting from the top, Mandopop is essentially; as the name infers; Mandarin language popular music. This brand of pop music has long been characterised by sad ballads that are full of subtle, lyrical meaning, with Taiwan contributing greatly to this idea (and to the scene) ever since t

Interview with Violet Lens紺樂團: Approaching East-meets-West music Through A Different 'Lens'

When you think ‘Taiwanese indie music’, those of you in the know might associate the term with kitschy groups dressed in colourful, mismatched outfits, or with distressed bands which always happen to have a female lead singer singing somewhat eerily. But no matter what popped up for you, I doubt ‘East-meets-West music’ was the first thing to spring to mind. A niche theme popularised by the likes of pop stars Wang Leehom, David Tao, Khalil Fong and more, it is surprising to see such influences creep into the underbelly of the Taiwanese music scene.

Weighing the Worth of Chinese TV Singing Competitions

In the past two or three years, China’s televised reality singing competitions have taken the region by storm. These shows boast high-flying artists as judges and mentors while promising audiences fresh cream-of-the-crop talent. Shows such as ‘Sing! China’ and ‘I Am Singer’ boast viewerships in the hundreds of millions, and are rapidly solidifying their reputation as a viable source of opportunity and success for artists both established in the Mandopop scene and amateurs looking to find fame. Y

Cream Of The C-pop #1-Interview with Diana Wang 王詩安: GOod Things Take Time

From getting distracted by cute kitties to waxing philosophical on her life journey, we went deep with the elusive Diana Wang in a sit-down interview the eve of her performance at the 2018 GMA Showcase. There’s been a flurry of excitement circulating the Netherlands born singer-songwriter since she unexpectedly announced signing with Khalil Fong’s new record label FU MUSIC last year, pushing out a new enticing Chinese Opera-meets-R&B sound.
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